Links to Mental Health Resources and Readings

The following links point to useful readings and websites of interest to those seeking psychological or mental health general education. Dr. Diez does not necessarily endorse their content nor have any control over the website's privacy policies.

Clinical References

● Anxiety. What is it? Am I an anxious person?● Coronavirus (COVID-19), fear, coping with it● Social Anxiety Association● Depression: What is it? Am I depressed?● Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA)● Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: What is it? AM I OCD?● International OCD Foundation● Medscape Psychiatry & Mental Health● National Center for Learning Disabilities● National Center for PTSD - Post-traumatic Stress Disorder ● The National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR)● National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)● National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)● National Sleep Foundation● American Foundation for Suicide Prevention● Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)

Couples, Relationships

Intimacy● How not to tank your relationship during social isolation● The effects of negativity in relationships (Gottman couples research)● Seven principles to make your relationship work (empirical research by Gottman)● What makes love last?● How to create sexual desire in your relationship (Esther Perel's video series)Psychotherapy and Couples Counseling ● What is "Integrative Psychotherapy?● Couples Marriage Counseling● Premarital Counseling● Divorce Counseling● Executive CoachingIdentity and Self● On the tyranny self-criticismWork● My boss is an a-hole. Should I quit?● My boss is a narcissist. How do I deal with him?● How to manage conflicts at the workplace

The Psychology of Risk

● Risk Perception: What is at stake?● Always a looser? Deficits in risk assessment

Behavioral Economics - Investment Psychology

● What is behavioral economics?

Mental Health Resources​

● American Psychological Association● Psychology Today (general topics of interest)● Internet Mental Health● National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)● National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)● American Psychiatric Association (APA)● How to find the right therapist (by New York Times)

Clinical References

  • Anxiety. What is it? Am I an anxious person?

    Anxiety is a mental state of both distress and arousal set off by sensing uncertain danger. It encompasses both cognitive elements—feelings of worry or dread in anticipation of some future bad outcome—and physical sensations, such as jitteriness and a racing heart. Although unpleasant, occasional bouts of anxiety are natural and sometimes even productive: By signaling that something isn’t quite right, anxiety can help people both avoid danger and make important and meaningful changes.
    But persistent, pervasive anxiety that disrupts one’s daily life, whether at school, work, or with friends, can be the mark of an anxiety disorder. Nearly one-third of adults in the U.S. will grapple with one at some point in their lives, according to the National Institutes of Health, and the condition strikes more women than men.
    Learn more...

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19), fear, coping with it

    The coronavirus pandemic has brought the world to its knees. According to an intelligence report from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, we are where we are in part because the Chinese government concealed when the virus first appeared in Wuhan in early December last year from the rest of the world. Now the world has to deal with the devastating consequences, probably the worst humanity has seen since World War II.
    As the tragedy unfolds before our eyes, hidden from all the chaos and upheaval is the increasing psychological costs of anxiety, fear, panic, and paranoia and the exacerbation of existing mental disorders such as trauma, depression, and substance abuse, both on an individual level and in society at large.
    Learn more.

  • Social Anxiety Association

    Social anxiety disorder (formerly termed "social phobia") is a much more common problem than past estimates have led us to believe. Millions of people all over the world suffer from this devastating and traumatic condition every day, either from a specific social anxiety or from a more generalized social anxiety.
    In the United States, epidemiological studies have recently pegged social anxiety disorder as the third largest psychological disorder in the country, after depression and alcoholism. It is estimated that about 7% of the population suffers from some form of social anxiety at the present time. The lifetime prevalence rate for developing social anxiety disorder is 13-14%
    Learn more.

  • Depression: What is it? Am I depressed?

    "The grey drizzle of horror," author William Styron memorably called depression. The mood disorder may descend seemingly out of the blue, or it may come on the heels of a defeat or personal loss, producing persistent feelings of sadness, worthlessness, hopelessness, helplessness, pessimism, or guilt. Depression also interferes with concentration, motivation, and other aspects of everyday functioning.
    According to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Globally, more than 300 million people of all ages suffer from the disorder. And the incidence of the disorder is increasing everywhere. Depression comes in forms ranging from major depression to dysthymia and seasonal affective disorder. Depressive episodes are also a feature of bipolar disorder.
    Learn more.

  • Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA)

    Founded in 1979, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention, treatment, and cure of anxiety, depression, OCD, PTSD, and co-occurring disorders through education, practice, and research. With more than 1,800 professional mental health members (many of whom contribute blog posts, host webinars, review website content and more) ADAA is a leader in education, training, and research. More than 11 million people from around the world visit the ADAA website annually (and click on more than 19,000,000 pages) to find current treatment and evidence-based research information and to access free resources and support. Together we are changing lives. Welcome!
    Learn more.

  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: What is it? AM I OCD?

    From hoarding to handwashing to forever checking the stove, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) takes many forms. It is an anxiety disorder that traps people in repetitive thoughts and behavioral rituals that can be completely disabling.
    Surveys conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health show that 2 percent of the population suffers from OCD—that's more than those who experience other mental illnesses like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and panic disorder. OCD might begin in childhood, but it most often manifests during adolescence or early adulthood. Scientists believe that both a neurobiological predisposition and environmental factors jointly cause the unwanted, intrusive thoughts and the compulsive behavior patterns that appease the unwanted thoughts.
    Learn more.

  • International OCD Foundation

    If you are living with OCD, you know that it can impact all areas of your life and pose unique challenges. Whether you have OCD or know someone who does, there are resources available to support you. The World Health Organization (WHO) has classified the ongoing worldwide outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) a pandemic. In response, public health experts around the world have asked individuals and organizations to take action to prevent and limit the transmission of this disease in their communities. This may create unique challenges for people in the OCD and related disorders community as we work to balance what’s best for population health and what’s best for our individual mental health. We've put together the following resources that you may find useful. If you have questions that aren't addressed here, please contact us at (617) 973-5801 or .gro.fdcoi%40ofni
    Learn more.

  • Medscape Psychiatry & Mental Health

    A recent study reported greater joy and prosocial positive emotions in people who cultivated their sense of awe and childlike wonder. Dr F. Perry Wilson comments.Learn more.
    Visit Medscape Site

  • National Center for Learning Disabilities

    Research.Advocacy.Action.
    We’re working to create a society in which every individual possesses the academic, social and emotional skills needed to succeed in school, at work and in life.
    Since 1977
    Improving the lives of the 1 in 5 children and adults nationwide with learning and attention issues—by empowering parents and young adults, transforming schools, and advocating for equal rights and opportunities.

    Learn more.

  • National Center for PTSD - Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

    We are the world's leading research and educational center of excellence on PTSD and traumatic stress.PTSD is a mental health problem that some people develop after experiencing or witnessing a life-threatening event, like combat, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault. It's normal to have upsetting memories, feel on edge, or have trouble sleeping after this type of event. If symptoms last more than a few months, it may be PTSD. The good news is that there are effective treatments.
    Learn more.

  • The National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR)

    Located within the Division of Lung Diseases of the NHLBI, the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR) was established in 1993 to foster the coordination of sleep and circadian research within NIH and other Federal agencies. Insufficient sleep and under-treatment of sleep disorders is a national health concern that causes a substantial economic burden to the U.S. economy each year due to accidents and lost productivity. Read Celebrating 25 Years of Research to Promote Healthy Sleep to learn more about the Center's legacy in research and initiatives.
    Learn more.

  • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) is one of the 27 institutes and centers that comprise the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIAAA supports and conducts research on the impact of alcohol use on human health and well-being. It is the largest funder of alcohol research in the world. NIAAA leads the national effort to reduce alcohol-related problems by:● Conducting and supporting alcohol-related research in a wide range of scientific areas including genetics, neuroscience, epidemiology, prevention, and treatment.● Coordinating and collaborating with other research institutes and federal programs on alcohol-related issues.● Collaborating with international, national, state, and local institutions, organizations, agencies, and programs engaged in alcohol-related work.● Translating and disseminating research findings to health care providers, researchers, policymakers, and the public.
    Through both research within NIAAA, and by funding grants at institutions worldwide, NIAAA aims to: ● Better understand the health effects of alcohol consumption, including why it can cause addiction.● Reveal the biological and socio-cultural origins of why people respond to alcohol differently.● Remove the stigma associated with alcohol problems.● Develop effective prevention and treatment strategies that address the physical, behavioral, and social risks that result from both excessive alcohol use, and underage alcohol consumption.
    Learn more.

  • National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

    NIDA is the lead federal agency supporting scientific research on drug use and its consequences.
    Learn more.

  • National Sleep Foundation

    We work under the premise that sleep is the third pillar of health alongside nutrition and exercise and worthy of as much attention, study, and effort. At SleepFoundation.org you’ll find valuable health information and tools to get the sleep you need and deserve.

    In December 2019, OneCare Media acquired SleepFoundation.org and licensed the site content from National Sleep Foundation. Our goal is to broaden the reach of SleepFoundation.org. The site features a medical board, expanded sleep science coverage, data-driven content, consumer reports, and intensive reviews of different sleep and wellness products. The site will continue to publish authoritative, timely research about topics related to sleep and health.

    The team at OneCare Media is honored to acquire and grow SleepFoundation.org. We’ve been involved in digital publishing since 2001, with a focus on health and wellness since 2015. We know it will allow us to help readers improve their sleep and health by providing high-quality content along the way.

    Learn more.

  • American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

    Whether you have struggled with suicide yourself or have lost a loved one, know you are not alone. Hear about personal experiences from people in your local community whose lives have been impacted by suicide.
    Learn more.

  • Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)

    The Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) is the only federally supported resource center devoted to advancing the implementation of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention. SPRC is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) under grant no. 5U79SM062297 and is located at Education Development Center.
    Learn more.

  • Panic Disorder

    Panic Disorder is a serious condition that around one out of every 75 people might experience. It usually appears during the teens or early adulthood, and while the exact causes are unclear, there does seem to be a connection with major life transitions that are potentially stressful: graduating from college, getting married, having a first child, and so on. There is also some evidence for a genetic predisposition; if a family member has suffered from panic disorder, you have an increased risk of suffering from it yourself, especially during a time in your life that is particularly stressful.
    Learn more.

Couples Relationships

Intimacy

  • How not to tank your relationship during social isolation

    Humans have evolved with a drive to share life with a partner—just not all day long. Our hunter-gatherer ancestors on the savanna formed pair-bonds, but they parted in the morning to go about their separate tasks. So did our ancestors on the farm. For hundreds of thousands of years, even the most devoted couples have been uttering some version of that basic romantic principle: “I married you for better or for worse, but not for lunch.”

    So what happens now that spouses are staying home all day, and many unmarried couples suddenly find themselves quarantined together? The peril facing relationships quickly became obvious to the pioneers of this new intimacy on the Diamond Princess cruise ship, where couples were cooped up for two weeks in their cabin during the ship’s quarantine. Ellis Vincent, a retired airline executive from Australia, told a reporter that he and his wife, Kimberly, were passing the time by having long conversations during which she displayed a remarkable memory.

    Learn more..

  • The effects of negativity in relationships (Gottman couples research)

    Whether it’s about not having enough sex, the dirty laundry, or spending too much money, conflict is inevitable in every marriage.

    To understand the difference between happy and unhappy couples, Dr. Gottman and Robert Levenson began doing longitudinal studies of couples in the 1970s. They asked couples to solve a conflict in their relationship in 15 minutes, then sat back and watched. After carefully reviewing the tapes and following up with them nine years later, they were able to predict which couples would stay together and which would divorce with over 90% accuracy.

    Their discovery was simple. The difference between happy and unhappy couples is the balance between positive and negative interactions during conflict. There is a very specific ratio that makes love last.

    Learn more.

  • Seven principles to make your relationship work (empirical research by Gottman)

    The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work is a 1999 book by John Gottman, which details seven principles for couples to improve their marriage. The book was based on Gottman's research in his Family Research Lab, known as the "Love Lab", where he observed more than 650 couples over 14 years.
    In The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work, Gottman argues that the basis for a happy marriage is a deep friendship with mutual respect and a positive attitude. He also emphasizes the importance of emotional intelligence in couples. In the course of the book, Gottman details seven principles for couples to follow in order to nurture their friendship and improve their marriage: enhancing their "love maps"; nurturing their fondness and admiration; turning toward each other instead of away; letting their spouse influence them; solving their solvable problems; overcoming gridlock; and creating a shared sense of meaning.
    Learn more.

  • What makes love last?


  • How to create sexual desire in your relationship (Esther Perel's video series)

Psychotherapy and Couples Counseling

  • What is "Integrative Psychotherapy?

    Psychotherapists always have been interested in, and have attempted to use, new developments in the natural and social sciences, philosophy, theology, the arts, and literature. However, for the most part, we have refused to learn psychotherapy from each other if our ideologies and allegiances are different. This isolationism has been contradicted by a small, but growing, group of scholars and clinicians who have been able to cross sectarian lines. These integrationists have aimed at establishing a useful dialogue among members of the various sectarian schools of psychotherapy. Their goal has been the development of the most effective forms of psychotherapy possible. The integration of therapies involves the synthesis of the "best and brightest" concepts and methods into new theories and practical systems of treatment. Given the rise of publications, journals, and professional societies concerned with psychotherapy integration, it seems that, as Arkowitz (1991) has announced, psychotherapy integration has come of age.

    The first approach to psychotherapy integration involved the translation of concepts and methods from one psychotherapeutic system into the language and procedures of another. A brief historical overview1 of this movement might begin with an attempt to convert Freudian psychoanalytic concepts into the terms of learning theories. As noted by Arkowitz (1984), whose fine history of psychotherapy integration has influenced extensively this more concise attempt, perhaps the first article of this type was written by Ischlondy (1930), and his work was expanded upon by French (1933) and by Kubie (1934). French was concerned with the correspondences between the Pavlovian constructs of inhibition, differentiation, and conditioning and the analytic concepts of repression, object choice, and insight. Kubie's expansion of these ideas moved him to consider the possibility of such phenomena as conditioning and disinhibition playing an important role in the relationship between the analyst and the analysand.

    Learn more..

  • Couples Marriage Counseling

    The coronavirus pandemic has brought the world to its knees. According to an intelligence report from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, we are where we are in part because the Chinese government concealed when the virus first appeared in Wuhan in early December last year from the rest of the world. Now the world has to deal with the devastating consequences, probably the worst humanity has seen since World War II.
    As the tragedy unfolds before our eyes, hidden from all the chaos and upheaval is the increasing psychological costs of anxiety, fear, panic, and paranoia and the exacerbation of existing mental disorders such as trauma, depression, and substance abuse, both on an individual level and in society at large.
    Learn more.

  • Premarital Counseling

    Social anxiety disorder (formerly termed "social phobia") is a much more common problem than past estimates have led us to believe. Millions of people all over the world suffer from this devastating and traumatic condition every day, either from a specific social anxiety or from a more generalized social anxiety.
    In the United States, epidemiological studies have recently pegged social anxiety disorder as the third largest psychological disorder in the country, after depression and alcoholism. It is estimated that about 7% of the population suffers from some form of social anxiety at the present time. The lifetime prevalence rate for developing social anxiety disorder is 13-14%
    Learn more.

  • Divorce Counseling

    "The grey drizzle of horror," author William Styron memorably called depression. The mood disorder may descend seemingly out of the blue, or it may come on the heels of a defeat or personal loss, producing persistent feelings of sadness, worthlessness, hopelessness, helplessness, pessimism, or guilt. Depression also interferes with concentration, motivation, and other aspects of everyday functioning.
    According to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Globally, more than 300 million people of all ages suffer from the disorder. And the incidence of the disorder is increasing everywhere. Depression comes in forms ranging from major depression to dysthymia and seasonal affective disorder. Depressive episodes are also a feature of bipolar disorder.
    Learn more.

  • Executive Coaching

    Founded in 1979, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention, treatment, and cure of anxiety, depression, OCD, PTSD, and co-occurring disorders through education, practice, and research. With more than 1,800 professional mental health members (many of whom contribute blog posts, host webinars, review website content and more) ADAA is a leader in education, training, and research. More than 11 million people from around the world visit the ADAA website annually (and click on more than 19,000,000 pages) to find current treatment and evidence-based research information and to access free resources and support. Together we are changing lives. Welcome!
    Learn more.